Chinese American Diet

chinese american diet

The Chinese American Diet

The Chinese American Diet is gaining popularity in the USA today as more people from that country are diagnosed with diabetes. However, many people are confused about the difference between white rice and brown rice, or the different types of grains. This is partly due to ignorance regarding nutrition and partially due to simple differences in the cooking styles used by Chinese and Americans. Rice is commonly used in both American and Chinese cooking styles, but the Chinese use a method called “moong” which is slightly different.

Interesting aspect of this Chinese American Diabetes

Another interesting aspect of this Chinese American Diabetes Diet is that there is surprisingly little research on whether this diet helps control blood sugar levels, or if it’s just a lucky factor. This diet has been around for many centuries, so it’s hard to say if its effectiveness is merely luck or if its part of the Chinese culture. However, the difference between white rice and brown rice seems to be one of the most important factors regarding the success of this Chinese American diet. In this article I’m going to explain what you need to know about this diet in order to start implementing it into your Chinese American Diabetes Diet.

Unlike other chinese diets, the Chinese American Diabetes Diet doesn’t have a special meal plan. Instead it’s based around the belief that any of the four food memories can provide us with energy. These food memories are: soup, stir-fry, salads and dinner. I’ve found that the easiest way to incorporate all of these food memories into my daily diet is to eat breakfast as much as possible, and then have a large amount of food at night. Since I’m not allowed to have sweets or snacks during the day, this is how I’ve been able to stay on the diet.

The thing I love about this Chinese American Diabetes Diet is that it’s easy to follow. Unlike other diets where you have to follow a complicated meal planning chart and sometimes have to be on medication. With this Chinese American diet there are less restrictions. You don’t have to worry about counting calories, gluten free rice or counting carbohydrates. All you have to do is eat food regularly, and of course you must take the recommended daily supplements.

The Chinese American diet features

For protein, the Chinese American diet features: pork, beef, poultry (but only organ meat), seafood (seafood is very important for the brain!) noodles, black beans, cabbage, cauliflower, corn, garlic, and broccoli. On the side you can add: rice, corn tortillas, low fat mayonnaise, chicken salad, vegetable dishes, tofu, cabbage wraps, and vegetable soups. As long as you get your protein from animal sources (meat and seafood) and plant sources (cereals and vegetables) you should be well on your way to eating a disease-free and extremely healthy diet!

As a side note, I should mention that there are a few problems with this Chinese American diet. The first problem is that this type of diet is extremely high in sodium, calories, and fat. The second problem is that it’s extremely high in cholesterol and trans fats, which should not be a part of the diet if you have type 2 diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes and are interested in following this type of diet, you should definitely talk to your doctor about it, because this type of diet doesn’t have to be followed indefinitely. However, if you want to lose some weight and improve your health, you may find that this diet is perfect for you.

As a side note, another aspect of the chinese american diet is that they don’t drink tea, coffee, alcohol, or much of anything else that westerners take for granted in their diet. To the Chinese it’s all about the food! It’s believed that the reason why there is no problem with obesity in chinese americans is because the people there don’t really understand how the body works.

When the Chinese started growing rice as a crop, it was considered a luxury because it took so long to grow. Therefore, people didn’t really eat much rice in their diets. However, as the years went by, the Chinese learned that rice was actually an important part of their lives, so they began to eat less white rice, and eat more chinese rice.