What Are The Health Benefits Of Aerobic Exercise

What Are The Health Benefits Of Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic exercise reduces the risk of many conditions, including obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, stroke and certain types of cancer.

Weight-bearing aerobic exercises, such as walking, help decrease the risk of osteoporosis.

Aerobic physical activity is an activity that requires oxygen as the main source of burning sugars to provide energy to the body. The level of activity should be low enough to avoid respiratory difficulties and respiratory difficulties or muscular pain. A higher intensity would involve the “anaerobic” system, i.e., the “anaerobic” system, i.e., processes that produce waste products from the effort, such as lactic acid, whose recycling and elimination are costly for the body.

For beginners or regular athletes, if the intensity of the effort remains measured, therefore essentially aerobic, the body will gradually adapt to the proposed efforts and

efforts proposed and regenerated itself by maintaining a good vascularization and a better muscle tone without exhausting itself. 

Aerobic endurance is “the ability to maintain a certain intensity of exercise over a prolonged of exercise over a prolonged period of time”.

Aerobic exercise is when your body is getting enough oxygen to maintain the level of exercise (you are not out of breath) and oxygen to maintain the level of exercise (you are not out of breath) and supply energy to the active muscles. By increasing the intensity of an aerobic workout, the body needs to use more oxygen. This is why the rate of breathing and heart rate increases.

In addition to being beneficial to weight control through the elimination of fat, regular practice of aerobic type activities contributes to the improvement of health on health on many other levels. Here are some examples of the benefits of aerobic activity: improves oxygen transport, strengthens the heart, regulates the heart regulates the amount of glucose in the blood, makes muscles more efficient Muscle improves sleep, contributes to a good mood, etc. 

To improve your aerobic activities, you should:

Do continuous, long-duration aerobic exercise. 

Long-term continuous exercise allows your body to become more efficient at using efficient in using oxygen. For example, you can jog or bike in jogging or biking in the wilderness, swimming laps or participating in an aerobics class at the pool, dancing with a group of friends, skiing friends, cross-country skiing, skating, playing soccer, and much more. And much more. The choice is yours!

Do interval training

Interval training allows your heart to grow and become a powerful pump. And become a powerful pump. E.g., Run for 3 min. Then rest by walking for 1 min. Then start again. Repeat for 30 min. and gradually increase the number of repetitions and Repeat for 30 minutes and gradually increase the number of repetitions and aerobic intensity. 1. make continuous, long-duration efforts 

Maximum oxygen consumption:

The oldest parameter for studying aerobic fitness is the measurement of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max), i.e., the maximum amount of oxygen that a subject can use per unit of time.

The lactic or ventilatory threshold

In addition to the VO2 max, it is interesting to determine the lactic threshold identified during an exercise with increasing load by a sudden increase in lactatemia. Increase in lactatemia. This is characterized by breathlessness. It can also be checked by calculating about 80% of the maximum heart rate, depending on age. Maximum heart rate. In the context of aging, the interest of these thresholds lies in the fact that they correspond to exercise intensities close to those of the daily life.

Comparison between aerobic and anaerobic

Aerobic physical activity is an activity that requires oxygen as the main source of combustion of sugars providing energy to the body. The activity level should be low enough that it does not impose breathing difficulties or respiratory difficulties, or muscular pain.

A higher intensity would involve in addition the “anaerobic” system, i.e., the “anaerobic” system, i.e., processes that produce waste products from the effort, such as lactic acid, whose recycling and elimination are costly for the body.

For beginners or regular athletes, if the intensity of the effort remains measured, therefore essentially aerobic, the body will gradually adapt to the proposed efforts proposed and regenerate itself by maintaining a good vascularization and a better muscle tone without exhausting itself. 

The anaerobic lactic pathway – the Wingate test

In the previous laboratory session, we characterized the anaerobic pathway and the role of phosphagens as an energy source for intense, intense muscle contraction. It was noted that the phosphagen system (the anaerobic lactic pathway) is mainly involved during very intense muscle contractions.

Intense muscle contractions. It was found that the phosphagen system is the fastest source of ATP for the muscle. This can be explained by the following

This is due to the following facts:

a) this system does not depend on a long series of reactions;

b) it does not depend on the transport of oxygen to the muscle; and

c) ATP and CP are stored directly in the sarcoplasm in the vicinity of the contractile near the contractile proteins of the muscle fibers.

The other anaerobic system by which ATP is resynthesized in the muscle, anaerobic glycolysis anaerobic glycolysis involves a partial degradation of carbohydrates into lactic acid.

From a chemical point of view, anaerobic glycolysis is more complicated than the phosphagen system. Indeed, it comprises a total of 12 distinct reaction reactions. The anaerobic lactic pathway allows, from one molecule of glucose, to release two ATP molecules and form two molecules of lactic acid.

The formation of lactic acid by muscle cells is a process that at rest, and accelerates under certain conditions of physical exercise.

This production also depends on the local glycogen stock, the type of muscle cell (I or II), and the intensity of the exercise, i.e., the oxygen supply.

The ATP/ADP ratio plays an essential role in the regulation of glycolytic flow. Any decrease in this ratio activates glycolysis, whereas maintaining it a high maintaining it at a high value (at rest) slows down the degradation of glucose.

It has been shown that in the trained person, cytoplasmic ADP penetrates rapidly into the rapidly into mitochondria lowering the mitochondrial ATP/ADP ratio.

This mechanism allows the ATP/ADP ratio to be maintained at a high value.

The ratio at a high value. This process, which is accompanied by a facilitated entry of glycolytic pyruvate into the mitochondria, ensures the utilization of this metabolite the Krebs in the Krebs cycle while decreasing its plasma level. The low concentration of pyruvate thus limits its transformation into lactate. If the intensity of the ATP/ADP ratio collapses, glycolysis is slowed down, and the is strongly stimulated, and a large part of the pyruvate formed is metabolized into lactate.

In practice, it isn’t easy to measure the ATP/ADP ratio to assess anaerobically anaerobic performance.

If we assume that :

a) muscle ATP is sufficient for only a few contractions;

b) maximum contractions for a few minutes or more depend mostly on aerobic metabolism aerobic metabolism; and,

c) maximum contractions for 2 to 3 minutes depend on anaerobic metabolism. It becomes metabolism, it becomes more reasonable to assess an athlete’s anaerobic capacity on a athlete on a temporal basis.

To do this, muscle anaerobic performance is considered to be dependent on three temporal components:

1) short-term anaerobic capacity, i.e., the real work that the muscle can do in 10 s. This kind of work is mainly supported by the concentration of muscle ATP and the ATP-CP system.

2) the medium-term anaerobic capacity, or the total work that the muscles can do during a maximal activity of a 30 s period. The performance under these conditions of intensity and time is supported mainly by the lactic compound (70%), the lactic compound (15%), and the aerobic compound (15%).

3) the long-term anaerobic capacity is defined as the total work

during a maximum exercise lasting 90 s. The performance of such activity depends equally on anaerobic and aerobic sources.

Hermanson (1969) hypothesized that the following factors had a limiting influence on energy production and its use for anaerobic work.

a) the rate of ATP production in the muscle fiber;

b) the starting levels of muscle glycogen;

c) the ability to tolerate a high level of lactic acid, between 20 to 25 mM in arterial blood and up to

arterial blood and up to 30 mm in the muscle.